Now What?

Discipleship is helping a person look more like Jesus today than they looked yesterday.

Anyone can do it.  Everyone should do it.  

When I was 19, and a sophomore in college, I heard the gospel for the very first time.  Some people think that most everyone has heard all about Jesus and already decided if they want anything to do with Him.  Not me.  Although I heard of Jesus, I didn’t know the story.   Then someone told me the Good News.  I decided to be a Christian that day.  Right then and there I walked the aisle, filled out a “got saved” sheet of paper, and scheduled my dip in the tiny church pool at the front of the sanctuary.  The entire administrative process of becoming a Christian took about as long as getting my drivers license.  It was all very confusing.

Once it was over I walked out with Christian Kevin, my friend who brought me to church with him, and asked, “Now what?”

Over the next several months I read my Bible and prayed all the time.  That’s what Christian Kevin said that I was supposed to do.  When I finished the Bible I went back and asked him again, “Now what?”.  He told me to start over.  Soon thereafter he invited me to small group with a bunch of other guys who read the Bible all the time.  We spent most of our meetings talking about how girls who wear short skirts made college very difficult for us and how it was tough to read the Bible every day.  I loved those guys, and they really did help me in my faith.

But there had to be more.

Some guys go to other countries on mission trips, but my barber went to work.  He had done college ministry most of his life.  One day he decided to become a barber so that he could connect with college students.  His entire ministry was about building relationships and talking about Jesus.  After all, once they get in the chair he could talk about anything he wants and they wont go anywhere unless they want a jacked up haircut.  I don’t know how many college students have met Jesus through his barbering, but it’s probably a lot.

One day I started hanging out with him outside the barber shop.  We would get bagels and talk about life and faith and college and girls.  Although we rarely opened our Bibles I could tell that I was becoming more like Jesus by hanging out with him.

“Follow me, as I follow Christ” – 1 Corinthians 11:1

The Corinthian church had never seen Jesus.  They had only heard stories about Him.  Although those stories were enough for them to commit their lives to the Gospel, they still had the question, “Now what?”.  Paul responded by offering himself as an example.  Although the church never saw Jesus, they did see Paul.  They knew him and how he would handle life.  Although he wasn’t perfect, he was a good picture of Jesus.  So they acted like Paul.

The relationship between the person following the guy who is following Jesus is discipleship

Jesus tells us all to make disciples.  The first thing we need to do is follow Christ ourselves.  Then, we have to find someone that can follow us.  It’s a lot of pressure, but there isn’t the expectation of perfection.

“Though the righteous man falls 7 times, they rise again” – Proverbs 24:16

No, not perfection, but persistence.  Following Jesus as a disciple maker is about learning from mistakes so that you can help the people behind you avoid them.

Anyone can do it.  Everyone should do it.  

As you are on this journey of faith, look back now and again.  Is there someone behind you asking the question, “Now what?”?  Where are you going to take them next?

 

 

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2 responses to “Now What?

  • Sarah

    When I first started reading this post, I thought to myself, “Man, I sure wish I had somebody that devoted to me to encourage me to grow stronger and deeper in my faith!” Then, I thought that’s selfish and inwardly focused, that I can be that person to myself and to others. I want to be that GREAT Christian, the one who has all the right answers and knows what to say at the right time to help people with their personal problems. What I lack is motivation. With kids I always have an excuse for why I dot have time to grow closer to God. I feel like having mentor would help me stay focused, but maybe God wants me to learn discipline and determination. Is it selfish to want somebody to take me under their wing and encourage me to grow deeper on a regular basis? I truly desire to know God on a deeper level, but I honestly struggle with sitting down and just readi the Bible. I feel like its just words and that’s why I enjoy books. But I know I should be passionate about desiring to read the Bible because it is Gods Word. Thank you for your posts though, I find them very insightful!

  • Michael Reeve

    Hi Sarah!

    I don’t think it’s selfish at all to want someone to help you know God on a deeper level. The truth is that we can all go only so far. Other people see things in us that we can’t see…or don’t want to see.

    Example: I had a friend who used to have really bad body odor. Finally someone said something to him about it. What surprised us the most was that he had NO IDEA! What was glaringly obvious to us what hidden from him. On one hand he was really thankful that someone mentioned it. On the other hand he was ticked off that it took us so long.

    In my opinion we all have stuff like that. Stuff that everyone else in the world knows, but they aren’t telling us. Perhaps it’s because we are unwilling to hear it or perhaps it’s because we haven’t cultivated the relationships where someone could speak truth into our lives.

    The point is that if we don’t cultivate those relationships we will grow to a certain point and Plateau. Those friends/mentors/life-coaches are the ones who God has provided to tell us what we need to hear to keep getting closer.

    Thanks for your kind words about the blog Sarah! I hope you can find a mentor who will help you continue on your walk with Jesus.

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